Blog/Documentation

In Training by Sarah Hymas

for our boat to have been a carrier bag, us singular on light-twisted stitches―oiled glass psalms evaporate from tongues balancing an envelope of water: an aired vessel, voice -less but for the geese in our bones. Listen left, pull right. Swan feet splatter the tug back- sliding against rowlock. This small colony lisping a wish for insignificance: 0.01% of planetary …

Hearing the Ruin: Ownership through Sound by Mark Dyer

On our visit to Gorton Monastery, Manchester, we were asked to think about ownership in relation to abandoned spaces; through walking, wall marking, and writing. But what about sound? In the two contrasting parts of the day, I started to wonder how sonic-based activities: Listening, Sounding (the act of making sound), and Recording, related to this theme of ownership. The …

Reaching for the Ruin/s by Gemma Meek

Each time I visit Gorton Monastery, the space appears to be in a state of transition. This time, an event is in preparation. Workers move elegantly through the rows of round, cabaret set tables and chairs. The staff seem focused, occasionally glancing at us, to make sure we don’t disturb their preparations. They talk to one another, smiling and conversing …

The Unseens: Reflections on Gorton by Ellen Jeffrey

I think what interested me most, at first, was the peeling paint – and the barely-there visibility of the layers underneath, other colours and other patterns. Later, someone refers to it as a “palimpsest”. Reading the information board, it detailed the layers underneath even this: the unseen layers, which the eye had no notion of. Reading of them, viewing them …

Traversing—or inhabiting with intimacy by Sarah Hymas

In Stone: An Ecology of the Inhuman, Jeffrey Jerome Cohen presents one sense of being “in” through his deconstruction of intimacy where “ in-” [acts] as indicator of estranged interiority” as opposed to ““in-” as negative prefix”, as if our reaching for the intimate is a reaching for a connection with something that once was and is no longer part …

Ownership or ‘Owning Up’ in Gorton by Lin Charlston

Arriving at Gorton station I am thinking about the way my rabbit asserts his ownership of the garden, rubbing his chin on familiar objects, nibbling a leaf, sniffing a plant pot, digging, rolling in the earth, urinating, chasing the pigeon. These daily routines establish his presence and appear to attach him to the place. I won’t be doing any of …

Lines of Flight and Palimpsests by Anne Caldwell

Rubbings from Gravel Path, Gorton, 2018. Anne Caldwell As I traverse these urban ruins, I think about a student of mine who is doing a dissertation on travel writing. She is basing her work on a cycle trip round the Black Sea, and talks about ‘how each contact with others, each new piece of information from our reading and each …

Drawing Lines Extending from a Yew Tree by Sara Davies

I let my fingers follow the lines in the drawing I begun in Grubbin’s wood, Arnside. The movement extends these lines off the page into my body. My fingertips meet the thin pen line turning inky strokes into narratives of remembrance. My touch, although invisible on the paper, extends the pen marks, through my memory, to an earlier moment in …

Grubbins by Myna Trustram

This time we are three, in clearings of miniature ash spires buttressed with moss. Speaking a hart’s tongued idiom. Looking around for something or other, maybe each other. Edged about with sawn up longings in paved down drives. One line is all it takes to stay on into the boring time.